BARGAINING UPDATE

Battle Ground Public Schools created this page to update the community on collective bargaining with the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA), which represents 860 certificated professionals (the vast majority are classroom teachers) in the district.

The current contract with BGEA expires Aug. 31, 2018. Battle Ground Public Schools has been negotiating since spring with BGEA to develop a contract for the 2018-19 school year.

Proposed average total teacher compensation 2018-21For 2018-19 in Battle Ground

  • the state is giving Battle Ground $69,129 for each state-funded, full-time equivalent (FTE), certificated instructional staff.
  • the district has offered a total compensation package that is above the state’s minimum salary requirements of $43,206 in Battle Ground for a new teacher.
  • the way education is funded in Washington has changed so that school districts will receive more state-distributed funds and less money from local levies. More information is available on the district’s budget web page.

Sustainability

Battle Ground’s board of directors and leadership team are committed to providing staff with fair wages that are fiscally responsible and sustainable.

District ComparisonsFactors that affect funding

Comparison of surrounding districts’ salaries and factors that affect funding available for compensation increases.

More information about each category of the comparison document is on the FAQ tab below.

Sept. 13, 2018 (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) continued bargaining on Thursday with the support of the state mediator. Bargaining teams for the district and BGEA remain $4.3 million apart in their offers.

The Battle Ground district’s multi-year proposal would increase expenditures by $6.8 million or 11.85 percent for teacher compensation in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18. Year 2 would increase expenditures by 18.4 percent over 2017-18, and year 3 would increase expenditures by 22.6 percent over 2017-18.

BGEA countered with a two-year proposal that would increase expenditures by $11.1 million or 19.35 percent for teacher compensation in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18. Year 2 would increase expenditures by 22.4 percent over 2017-18.

Sept. 9, 2018 (mediated)

After nearly 12 hours of mediated bargaining on Sunday with its teachers association, Battle Ground Public Schools has filed a request with the Public Employment Relations Commission (PERC) for fact finding. Bargaining teams for the district and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) remain $4.7 million or 8 percent apart in their offers.

Battle Ground’s proposal would add $6.6 million for teacher compensation in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18. BGEA’s proposal would add $11.3 million for teacher compensation in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18.

Sunday’s multi-year proposal from the district would:

  • Provide an average total compensation for teachers of $74,338 (excluding benefits) in 2018-19, or an increase of 11.6 percent over 2017-18.
  • Provide an average total compensation for teachers of $78,521 (excluding benefits) in 2019-20, or an increase of 17.8 percent over 2017-18.
  • Provide an average total compensation for teachers of $80,251 (excluding benefits) in 2020-21, or an increase of 20.8 percent over 2017-18.

BGEA countered the district’s offer with a one-year, proposed increase of 19.6 percent to teacher compensation in 2018-19 over 2017-18. This proposal from BGEA is 0.3% higher than the association’s previous proposal.

Sept. 7, 2018 (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools worked with the state-appointed mediator for more than 9 hours in bargaining on Friday. The district presented new multi-year proposals to the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) that would give teachers an average salary increase of 11.6 percent in 2018-19.

BGEA countered the district’s offer with a proposed increase of 19.3 percent to teacher compensation in 2018-19 and 22.4 percent in 2020-21 over 2017-18.

The district and BGEA will meet in mediated bargaining this weekend.

Details
Friday’s proposal from the district includes the following salary levels for total teacher compensation:

2018-19 (excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $50,019
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $94,629
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $74,399

2019-20 (excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $51,541
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $97,507
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $78,130

2020-21 (excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $52,851
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $99,986
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $80,116

Sept. 6, 2018 (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) continued bargaining for 14 hours on Thursday with the state-appointed mediator but have not yet reached an agreement on teacher compensation. During bargaining, the district and BGEA exchanged information to help with the mutual understanding of financial information. The BGPS BGEA comparison document shows how Battle Ground compares to other districts on teacher salaries (2018-19 is based on Sept. 5 offer) and factors that affect funding available for compensation increases. More information about the comparison is in the FAQ. Bargaining teams are scheduled to meet again on Friday.

Sept. 5, 2018, 11:00 p.m. (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) bargained until 11:30 p.m. on Wednesday with the state-appointed mediator. The district presented new proposals that would give teachers an average salary increase of 11.5 percent in 2018-19.

BGEA countered with a proposed one-year increase of 19.5 percent to teacher compensation in 2018-19.

Details
Wednesday’s proposal from the district includes the following salary levels for total teacher compensation:

2018-19 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $50,019
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $94,629
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $74,315

2019-20 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $51,297
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $97,047
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $77,317

2020-21 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $52,735
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $99,767
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $79,057

Sept. 4, 2018, 4 p.m. (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) bargained all day on Tuesday with the state-appointed mediator. The district presented an enhanced multi-year offer that would give teachers an average salary increase of 11 percent in 2018-19, and a total average increase of 20.3 percent over three years.

BGEA countered with a proposed one-year increase of 19.7 percent to teacher compensation in 2018-19.

Details
The district proposal includes the following salary levels for total teacher compensation:

2018-19 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $47,482
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $91,269
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $74,043

2019-20 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $48,716
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $93,641
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $77,858

2020-21 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $50,177
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $96,449
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $80,193

Sept. 3, 2018, 10 p.m. (mediated)

Battle Ground Public Schools and the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) bargained for 12 hours on the Labor Day holiday with the state-appointed mediator. The district presented an updated multi-year offer that would give teachers an average salary increase of 10 percent in 2018-19, and a total average increase of 15.7 percent over two years.

BGEA countered with a proposed one-year increase of 22.6 percent to teacher compensation in 2018-19.

Details
The district proposal includes the following salary levels for total teacher compensation:

2018-19 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $47,035
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $90,409
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $73,338

2019-20 (Excluding retirement and benefits)

  • Starting:  $48,234
  • Top of Salary Schedule (16 years):  $92,714
  • Average total compensation for teachers: $77,155

Sept. 3, 2018, 2 p.m. (mediated)

In bargaining this weekend, Battle Ground Public Schools offered an updated multi-year contract to the Battle Ground Education Association (BGEA) that would provide a three-year increase to the average total teacher compensation of 19.3 percent over 2017-18. The district is continuing to meet with BGEA in mediated bargaining.

Details: 

  • BGPS average total teacher compensation in 2017-18 was $66,685
  • The BGPS offer would increase the average total teacher compensation by 19.3 percent over three years
    • 2018-19 average total compensation would be $73,343, a 10 percent increase over 2017-18; a first-year teacher would make $46,999, while a teacher with 21+ years would make $90,354 (not including benefits)
    • 2019-20 average total compensation would be $76,558, a 14.8 percent increase over 2017-18; a first-year teacher would make $48,184, while a teacher with 21+ years would make $92,589  (not including benefits)
    • 2020-21 average total compensation would be $79,534, a 19.3 percent increase over 2017-18; a first-year teacher would make $49,518, while a teacher with 21+ years would make $95,102 (not including benefits)
  • BGEA continues to ask for a one-year contract that would increase the average total compensation by 24.2 percent in 2018-19

August 30, 2018 (mediated)

The district and BGEA met in mediated bargaining for six hours on Thursday, Aug. 30 to come to a place of mutual understanding about the funding available in the district’s budget for staff compensation. The bargaining teams did not reach an agreement on compensation for certificated instructional staff.

Battle Ground is committed to bargaining and will meet with BGEA again on Sunday and possibly on following days.

The district made the most recent offer on Aug. 26, for the 2018-2021 school years. (See salary schedules below.)

August 28, 2018 (mediated)

The district and BGEA met in mediated bargaining on Tuesday, Aug. 28

The district and BGEA discussed compensation. The district also wanted to discuss McCleary funding with BGEA, and the mediator shared with BGEA a district document showing the amount of funding that is available in the district’s budget for basic education teacher compensation as a result of the McCleary decision. BGEA was not willing to discuss funding with the district’s team.

Battle Ground Public Schools has agreed to have a finance representative from the Washington Education Association (WEA) participate in a discussion to help resolve this issue. The district is hoping that the WEA representative will be available for the next bargaining session on Thursday.

Aug. 26, 2018 (mediated)

The district and BGEA met in mediated bargaining for six hours on Sunday, Aug. 26, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The mediator requested that BGPS and BGEA meet face to face to develop a mutual understanding of the district budget and funding available for compensation increases. The mediator shared district documents with BGEA on the sustainability of proposals from both the district and BGEA. BGEA declined to have this discussion, and requested a revised offer from the district. The sustainability documents are available as PDFs:
Sustainable – BGPS BGEA proposals
Sustainable – BGPS budgeted revenues

The district brought up the possibility of a multi-year agreement and developed a proposal and cost analysis. The district provided the following proposal to BGEA, which did not respond.

Summary of District Proposal

The district proposed a 3-year contract: 6.5% in 2018-19, 2% in 2019-20, and 2% in 2020-2021. Download the 2018-2021 certificated compensation schedule.

  • New commitment to increase salary the greater of 2% or the state inflationary adjustment (implicit price deflator, IPD) in 2019-20 and 2020-21

Maintain proposed salary schedule:

  • Total average compensation increases 6.5% to $72,760 in 2018-19;
    $70,983 average base salary
    $1,777 average TRI (3 days), $200, and Professional Learning Day compensation
  • Total average compensation in 2019-20 (estimated): $75,975;
    2 (total) Professional Learning Days compensation
  • Total average compensation in 2020-21 (estimated): $78,818;
    3 (total) Professional Learning Days compensation

The District’s 3-year proposal is a 18.2% increase in total compensation over the 2017-18 average compensation of $66,685 for the same duties, plus the addition of one state-funded professional learning day each year (total of 3 in 2020-21). Former undesignated TRI is not lost, it is included in the base salary.

BGPS Proposed 3 Year Salary Schedule (Yr-1) 2018-21; Aug-26BGPS Proposed 3 Year Salary Schedule (Yr-2) 2018-21; Aug-26BGPS Proposed 3 Year Salary Schedule (Yr-3) 2018-21; Aug-26

Aug. 19, 2018:

Summary of District Proposal

  • New salary schedule: total average compensation increases 6.5% to $72,760: 
    • $70,983 average base salary
    • $1,777 average TRI (3 days), $200, and Professional Learning Day compensation

The District’s proposal is a 6.5% increase in total compensation over 2017-18, for the same duties, plus one state-funded professional learning day. Former undesignated TRI is not lost, it is included in the base salary.

A Tale of Five Teachers (6.5% increase)

Teacher 1:

  • Eric as a Year 0, BA Degree (19 people on scatter gram)
  • 17-18 Earned: Base ($36,521) + TRI ($6,099) = $42,620
  • 18-19 Offer: Base +TRI ($42,620) + 6.5% ($2,770) = $45,390

Teacher 2:

  • Lena as a Year 4, BA + 90/MA (14 people on scatter gram)
  • 17-18 Earned: Base ($45,714) + TRI ($7,634) = $53,348
  • 18-19 Offer: Base + TRI ($53,348) + 6.5% ($3,468) = ($56,816)

Teacher 3:

  • Sam as a Year 12, BA + 45 (19 people on scatter gram)
  • 17-18 Earned: Base ($51,753) + TRI ($8,643) = $60,396
  • 18-19 Offer: Base +TRI ($64,321) + 6.5% ($1,629) = $65,950

Teacher 4:

  • Bethany as a Year 16, BA + 90/MA (56 People on the scatter gram)
  • 17-18 Earned: Base ($61,924) + TRI ($10,341) = $72,265
  • 18-19 Offer: Base +TRI ($72,265) + 6.5% ($4,697) = $76,963

Teacher 5:

  • Katie at Year 25, MA + 90 (198 People on the scatter gram)
  • 17-18 Earned: Base ($68,836) + TRI ($11,496) = $80,332
  • 18-19 Offer: Base +TRI ($80,332) + 6.5% ($5,222) + Longevity ($2,500) = $88,053

Battle Ground Public Schools Proposed Salary Schedule 2018-19 (6.5% increase)

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

BGPS Proposed Salary Schedule 2018-19; Aug 19

Aug. 1, 2018:

2017-18

  • State allocated average salary ($36,521 x staff mix1 1.53755) = $56,153
  • 16.7% TRI2 Stipend + 3 Days (1.7%), $10,332
  • $200 [professional fund/classroom supplies]
  • Total average salary = $66,685 ($10,532 TRI2 & $200)
  • 860.710 FTE3 x $66,685 = $57.4 million ($9.1 TRI2)

BGSD 8/1/18 2nd Proposal5, 6% (and additional longevity)

  • Average Base Salary = $70,655
  • Four days (3 Start-up, 1 PLD4 and $200)2 = $1,795
  • Average total Salary = $ 72,450
  • 860.71 FTE3 = $62.4 million
  • Details:
    • Starting Salary (0 Years, BA & 0 Credits):
      • Base: $45,177
      • TRI2: $1,204
      • Total $46,3816
    • 16 Years, MA +90 Credits
      • Base: $85,152
      • TRI2: $2,092
      • Total: $87,244
    • Maximum Salary:
      • Base: $87,652
      • TRI2: $2,092
      • Total: $89,744

1Staff mix: The staff mix factor has been a number generated by the state to reflect the average education and experience of certificated instructional staff (CIS) working in the district. For more information see the Washington statute on the staff mix factor.
2TRI: Time, responsibility and incentive as described by RCW 28A.400.200 section 4.
3FTE: Full-time equivalent certificated instructional staff (CIS)
4PLD: Professional learning day
5Second proposal from BGSD on this bargaining day
6RCW 28A.400.200 set the minimum starting teacher salary for full-time certificated instructional staff at $40,000, to be adjusted annually by the Inflationary Adjustment Index, and adjusted for regional differences. For Battle Ground, with 1.9% IPD applied to $40,000 and 6% regionalization in 2018-19, this equates to $43,206 for a first-year teacher.

BGEA 8/1/18 Proposal

  • Average Base Salary = $75,963
  • 11.75% TRI2 Stipend ($8,926) + $200 + Four days (3 Start-up, 1 PLD4) ($1,671) = $10,797
  • Total average salary = $86,760 ($10,797 TRI2)
  • 860.710 FTE3 = $74.7 million ($9.3 TRI2)

Is Battle Ground's offer sustainable?

Battle Ground’s board of directors and leadership team are committed to providing staff with fair compensation that is fiscally responsible and sustainable. A sustainability example showing how much McCleary funding is available after the levy reduction for different employee groups is online.

Is Battle Ground giving all the McCleary funding from E2SSB6362 to its teachers?

The Washington State Legislature gave school districts additional money in E2SSB6362 to fully fund all of basic education and comply with the Washington State Supreme Court’s decision in the McCleary case.

Battle Ground will receive McCleary funding for ALL of basic education, including salaries for state-funded certificated, classified and administrative employees and funding for special purpose programs such as career and technical education (CTE), special education, Running Start, the Learning Assistance Program (LAP), bilingual and highly capable.

The new McCleary funding also will replace the money that the district will lose from the reduction of its local levy over the next two years. This is referred to as the levy swap. Battle Ground’s levy will be reduced by nearly half over two years.

Battle Ground’s offer would give teachers an average total compensation in 2018-19 that is more than the $69,129 that Battle Ground will receive from the state for each state-funded certificated instructional staff member. Battle Ground would provide the compensation to certificated staff whether they are funded by the state or not, and Battle Ground has about 16 percent unfunded staff. Battle Ground’s offer is more than what it will receive in funding for teachers’ salaries and requires levy dollars to fund the extra amount for each state-funded staff, plus funding from the levy to pay for the unfunded staff above the prototypical school model.

Is Battle Ground giving its teachers all the McCleary funding that the state sent it for teachers?

Yes, and more. The district has offered the Battle Ground Education Association a proposed contract that would provide teachers with an average total compensation that is more than the $69,129 that the state is giving Battle Ground for each state-funded certificated instructional staff. Battle Ground will use both McCleary and local levy funds to provide the compensation.

How does Battle Ground compare to surrounding districts?

The comparison document shows how Battle Ground compares to other districts on teacher salaries and factors that affect funding available for compensation increases.

  • The Unassigned Fund Balance provides financial stability for the district and maintains sound financial practices, including having sufficient cash flow to meet district obligations. Battle Ground policy establishes that the district will have an unassigned fund balance account of at least 6 percent expenditures, and the current balance is 3.95 percent.
  • The Washington Legislature capped local school district levies at $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value. Most districts have voter-approved levies above this amount, so will incur a Levy Loss. Battle Ground will lose 59 percent of its local levy over the next two school years (49 percent considering levy equalization from the state).
  • The Net New Revenue (Per Student 19-20 Sustainability) takes into account the McCleary funding that districts will receive for ALL of basic education and subtracts the local levy funds that districts will lose, then divides the result by projected student enrollment to show how much net new revenue is expected per student in 2019-20 when the full impact of the levy loss is realized. Battle Ground expects net new revenue of $227 per student.
  • Basic Ed Unfunded Staff is the percent of certificated instructional staff that each district has above the number of staff that is funded by the state according to the prototypical school model. Battle Ground has about 12 percent unfunded basic education teaching staff.
  • Staff mix is a factor that shows the experience of a district’s staff (a higher number equals more experience). Prior to this year, districts received more state funding if they had a larger portion of experienced teachers. Battle Ground has an above-average (more experienced) staff mix of 1.5376.

Are you eliminating teacher TRI pay?

No, teachers will continue to receive TRI (time, responsibility and incentive pay). However, under the state’s new funding model, a larger portion of teachers’ total compensation will be shifted from TRI into their base salary.

Can Battle Ground use its financial reserves for teachers' salaries?

Battle Ground Public Schools’ Board Policy 6022 has established that the district will have an unassigned fund balance account of at least 6 percent of the current general fund budgeted expenditures to provide stability for the district’s instructional program and maintain sound financial practices.

As of Aug. 31, 2018, the district’s unassigned fund balance was $5.8 million, or 3.9 percent of general fund expenditures. This balance would cover the district’s operating expenses for 31 days. The Government Finance Officers Association recommends an unrestricted fund balance of 10 percent of year to date expenditures or no less than two months of operating expenditures.

How will the strike affect the school year calendar and graduations?

State law requires 180 days of instruction, which will begin once the work stoppage is over. The school year calendar will be adjusted (i.e., the final day of the 2018-19 school year will be later in the summer—much like snow days are added to the end of the school calendar). Dates for graduation might need to be adjusted as well.

What is the levy swap?

2018-19 marks the beginning of significant changes to how K-12 education is funded in Washington state. In the past, both the state and local communities provided funds to schools from property tax levies. School districts used local levies to bridge the gap between state funding and the true cost of basic education. Over the years, the use of local levies created inequity across the state, which led to the McCleary lawsuit. This lawsuit was recently settled, bringing attention to basic education funding in Washington.

To meet the State Supreme Court’s order to fully fund basic education in Washington, the state Legislature reduced the amount of local levy dollars districts can collect through property taxes and increased the amount that the state collects through property taxes and then redistributes to all schools. Essentially, property owners send fewer tax dollars directly to their local district and send more tax dollars to the state for all districts. This exchange of state and local property taxes has been labeled the “levy swap.”

In 2019, the local Battle Ground Public Schools levy will be capped at $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value, while the state will maintain its increased schools levy rate. These changes are known as the “levy swap” that the Washington State Legislature voted in with the passing of Engrossed House Bill 2242.

Has the state already sent the McCleary money to school districts?

School districts do not receive apportionment until the end of the month, so it will not start receiving McCleary funding until the end of September 2018.

How are teachers funded by the state?

This is one of the big changes in the new funding model.  In the previous system, the state funded the number of teachers allocated based on student population.  If a district chose to increase the amount of staff beyond the state allocation, it did so through other funding sources such as the local levy. Battle Ground has chosen to fund staff beyond the state allocation.

In addition, the amount of money received used to be based on the experience of the teaching staff. If a district had a larger portion of experienced teachers, then it would receive more funding through a factor called staff mix. Battle Ground has a veteran teaching staff, so it benefited from the previous system.

In the new model, the state provides the average state teacher salary plus any regionalization factor for each district. Staff mix was eliminated. Districts with more veteran teaching staffs receive less proportional funding then they previously did in this model.

Have teachers received raises in the past?

Battle Ground teachers have received raises on a regular basis. Over the last three years, teachers have seen increases between 14 and 15.6 percent. The McCleary decision puts benchmarks on starting, average, and top teacher salaries.  Average teacher salary is calculated by multiplying the staff mix, a calculation determined by the state that accounts for the experience of your staff, by the starting teacher salary.

 Starting TeacherAverage TeacherTop Teacher
2014-15$36,874$57,667$69,500
2015-16$39,172$60,704$73,833
% Change*6.23%5.27%6.23%
2016-17$40,270$62,115$75,901
% Change*2.8%2.32%2.8%
2017-18$42,620$65,741$80,332
% Change*5.84%5.84%5.84%
3-Year % Change*15.58%14%15.58%

*Includes annual state COLAs, LEAP/SAM (Washington K–12 Salary Allocation Schedule for Certificated Instructional Staff) annual salary step increases, and TRI increases. Does not include benefits, 3 start-up days or Teacher $200 (professional funds).

Does the district's calculation of average total teacher (certificated instructional staff) compensation include administrator pay?

No. Certificated instructional staff includes classroom teachers (basic education, specialists, special education, career and technical education)  and teachers on special assignment, counselors, librarians, nurses, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, and occupational therapists. Administrators fall into the category of administrative staff, which includes principals and assistant principals and district administrators.

Why did the Materials and Supplies and Purchased Services budgets increase by $10.2 million in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18?

Five line items in the 2018-19 budget increased by a total of $10.2 million for budget contingencies in 2018-19:

$7 million unassigned from McCleary budgeted as a contingency in Materials and Supplies and Purchased Services for certificated and classified salary and benefits. When the 2018-19 budget was developed in June, the district had not yet settled with any of its employee bargaining teams, so the total amount needed to budget for salaries and benefits was unknown. The district budgeted a 3.1* percent increase (based on the consumer price index) in expenses for salaries, and budgeted the remaining unassigned from McCleary as a contingency until: 1) contracts are settled, 2) final salary and payroll benefit expenses could be established, and 3) the budget contingency could be assigned to salary and benefits for each employee group. The expenses of settled contracts and current proposals for 2018-19 exceed the unassigned $7 million. (*Compensation increases for the 2018-19 school year are limited to the CPI, with a few exceptions, such as step increases and staffing changes — E2SSB 6362 Sections 204, 207, and 208.)

$1.1 million budgeted for student enrollment growth. The district budgets for state apportionment that it expects to receive as a result of increased enrollment. This contingency is also allocated to Materials and Supplies. These funds would provide staffing and student instructional needs (supplies, furniture, etc.) for additional students in the district. If the district’s enrollment does not increase by the budgeted student enrollment projections, the district will not receive these funds from the state nor incur any expenses, therefore it would have a net $0 impact.

$1 million building budget carryover in Purchased Services. Schools are permitted to carry over unspent funds from the previous years into the following year’s budget. These funds are managed by each school’s leadership team, which comprises principals and staff. Buildings use these funds to provide for instructional and support needs.

$700,000 categorical program carryovers budgeted in Materials and Supplies. These unspent funds are carried over from the previous year into the following year’s budget. The majority of these funds are managed by the Career and Technical Education (CTE) program, which uses the money to provide skills-based classes to middle and high school students.

$400,000 curriculum adoption budgeted in Purchased Services. Battle Ground Public Schools has budgeted $400,000 to help cover the cost of a new high school curriculum for English Language Arts. The adoption is in the final stages.

RECENT ARTICLES

“… the $8.1 billion that Washington lawmakers approved in their last two sessions to satisfy McCleary was not intended to just address teacher salaries.”

Editorial: Our teachers are being fed a bowl of lies, ClarkCountyToday.com

“As both sides state their case, it is imperative to settle upon budgets that are sustainable and that prepare districts for the future. Anything less would be irresponsible and would poorly serve the taxpayers who foot the bill.”

In Our View: Bargain for Sustainability, The Columbian

“A number of districts have sounded alarm bells that the raises teachers are demanding could leave them short of the money they need to finish the second phase of the McCleary mandated funding, which is reducing class sizes.”

Battle Ground teachers latest to approve a strike, ClarkCountyToday.com

“School districts will not receive the same amount of funding for the same amount of teachers. This means that one district’s ability to provide a salary increase may be dramatically less than another district located right next door.”

WSSDA Executive Director statement on 2018-2019 school district budgets and collective bargaining

“Your practical limitation on collective bargaining is your ability to fund compensation increases in the short-term AND your ability to sustain those increases. Not every district will have an equal opportunity to provide compensation increases with double-digit percentages.”

Chris Reykdal, Superintendent of Public Instruction

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