School Choice and SES Information

2015-16 Annual Yearly Progress (AYP)

This webpage is designed to provide parents information on state-approved Supplemental Education Services (SES) and School Choice options. Below you will find copies of the parent letters sent home on August 14, 2015 to impacted schools, links to state approved providers, and frequently asked questions. Please contact Dr. Jill Smith at (360) 885-5414 or smith.jill@battlegroundps.org

Contents

  1. 1 Parent Letters and Forms
  2. 2 SES Information
  3. 3 Battle Ground Public Schools SES Provider Handbook:
  4. 4 School Choice
  5. 5 Schools Served by SES and Public School Choice 
  6. 6 Learning by Choice
  7. 7 Most students in Washington go to the public schools that are closest to their homes; however, parents and guardians have many enrollment options for their kids. In 1990, the state Legislature formalized some of the state's public school options by passing the Learning by Choice law. The law consists of three major components:
  8. 8 Family Choice allows parents to select which public school(s) their children will attend, within certain limitations; Running Start permits students in 11th and 12th grades to enroll in courses or programs in a community or technical college, as well as selected public universities and tribal colleges, without paying college tuition; and Seventh- and Eighth-Grade Choice gives students in those grades credits for completing high school courses.
  9. 9 OSPI's Learning by Choice booklet contains answers to the most commonly asked questions about the Learning by Choice law, options created by the NCLB Act, descriptions of programs that may be available to students if they meet program eligibility criteria, and other enrollment options available to students in public, private, and home-based instruction.  View OSPI's document, Learning by Choice (PDF).
  10. 10 Frequently Asked Questions
    1. 10.1 What is NCLB/AYP?
    2. 10.2 What is Title I, Part A? 
    3. 10.3 Is our school “Failing?”
    4. 10.4 What is Supplemental Educational Services (SES)?
    5. 10.5 What is Public School Choice?


Parent Letters and Forms

2015-16 Title I AYP



SES Information


Enrollment Windows: 

  • 1st Enrollment: August 20 - September 2, 2015 (Tutoring begins approx. October 2015)
  • 2nd Enrollment: November 10 - November 24, 2015 (Tutoring begins approx. December 2015) 

District Contacts: 

District Calendars:

Click here for district calendars. 


SES Non-regulatory Guidance (PDF) 

SES Providers (OSPI List) http://www.k12.wa.us/TitleI/SES/default.aspx 


Battle Ground Public Schools SES Provider Handbook:

Battle Ground Public Schools are committed to the educational success of our students. We are providing this Handbook to the Supplemental Educational Services (SES) Providers that have been approved by OSPI and have indicated interest in serving Battle Ground Public Schools during the 2015-2016 school year. Please click here to view the handbook. Please contact Shannon Randol or Connie Miller to answer any questions. 


School Choice

As part of NCLB, you have the option of requesting Public School Choice, an opportunity to transfer your child to an eligible choice school within the district. If you elect this option, transportation will be provided through the Title I program at no cost to parents. The eligible choice school for the 2015-16 school year is Maple Grove School, which is a K-8 school.  Maple Grove School will only be an eligible choice school for the 2015-16 school year, consequently, transportation to the school will not be provided after this year. 


If you have questions regarding this option, please call Dr. Jill C. Smith, Executive Director of Federal Programs and Instructional Support Services at (360) 885-5376.


School Choice Request Form (PDF) *NOTE: The deadline for this form is September 1, 2015. 


Schools Served by SES and Public School Choice 

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act of 2001 requires the state and district to review annually the academic progress of federally funded Title I, Part A schools and to identify schools in need of improvement. Schools are identified as in need of improvement after two consecutive years of not making adequate yearly progress (AYP). Washington State determines AYP by considering progress in reading, mathematics, testing participation, graduation rates, and unexcused absence rates. For the past two years, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, Washington State has received a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education, excusing our districts from participating in the AYP process. In March 2014, Washington State was denied the waiver and our school districts must return to this system of reporting. The NCLB system requires 100% of all students meet proficiency standards by 2014, regardless of special needs, English language mastery, or other life-impacting circumstances. 


Over the past three years Battle Ground schools have seen overall improvement in test scores, student attendance and performance standards; however, we do not meet the 100% benchmark required by the NCLB act at this time. The following charts display the number of students eligible AND the number of participating students for Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services (SES).  Click here to view a chart of schools served by SES and Public School Choice options.  

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Learning by Choice

Most students in Washington go to the public schools that are closest to their homes; however, parents and guardians have many enrollment options for their kids. In 1990, the state Legislature formalized some of the state's public school options by passing the Learning by Choice law. The law consists of three major components:

  1. Family Choice allows parents to select which public school(s) their children will attend, within certain limitations;
  2. Running Start permits students in 11th and 12th grades to enroll in courses or programs in a community or technical college, as well as selected public universities and tribal colleges, without paying college tuition; and
  3. Seventh- and Eighth-Grade Choice gives students in those grades credits for completing high school courses.

OSPI's Learning by Choice booklet contains answers to the most commonly asked questions about the Learning by Choice law, options created by the NCLB Act, descriptions of programs that may be available to students if they meet program eligibility criteria, and other enrollment options available to students in public, private, and home-based instruction.  View OSPI's document, Learning by Choice (PDF).


Frequently Asked Questions

What is NCLB/AYP?

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 requires the state and district to review annually the academic progress of federally funded Title I, Part A schools and to identify schools in need of improvement.  Schools are identified as in need of improvement after two consecutive years of not making adequate yearly progress (AYP).  Washington determines AYP by considering the following three measures:

  • The percentage of students scoring at the “proficient” or “advanced” level on the Washington Standards Tests for English-language arts and mathematics.
  • The percentage of students participating in those tests.
  • The graduation rate for high schools/unexcused absence rate for elementary and middle schools.

What is Title I, Part A? 

Title I, Part A is a federal program that provides supplemental services in reading, writing, and/or math serves the unique needs of children. It was introduced under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965 and was augmented by the 2001 “No Child Left Behind” Act. This program provides financial assistance to public schools with high numbers or percentages of low income children to help ensure that all students meet state academic content and achievement standards.

Is our school “Failing?”

No. Our Title I, Part A funded schools are a part of a “School Improvement Process.” Each school is placed into a “Step for School Improvement” based on their average AYP scores.  Schools are identified as in need of improvement after two consecutive years of not making adequate yearly progress (AYP). Washington State determines AYP by considering progress in reading, mathematics, testing participation, graduation rates, and unexcused absence rates. The steps range from 1 – 5, each with specific plans for improvement. 

What is Supplemental Educational Services (SES)?

Supplemental Educational Services are tutoring services provided by tutoring companies approved by the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and paid for by Title I funds set aside by the school district for this purpose.  This extra help may be provided to your child in reading, writing, and/or math. The extra help can be provided before or after school, on weekends, during school vacation times, or during summer at no cost to you. A complete list of SES tutoring options can be found on the OSPI website: http://www.k12.wa.us/TitleI/SES/2014/2014SESApprovedProviders.pdf.  If you need assistance in making a selection of an SES provider for your child, please contact Lisa Hipolito or Connie Miller in the Title I office at (360) 885-1547. 

What is Public School Choice?

Public School Choice is an option under the No Child Left Behind legislation that allows a parent to transfer their child out of a school that has been identified for school improvement into another school in the district that has not been identified for school improvement. 

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